Networked Learning Post #3

This past week I wrapped up the first step in my Networked Learning Project and what was assigned in my class for it. I plan on continuing to learn about snowmobile engines and be able to take care and maintain mine for years to come. The first step in this process for me was learning to remove and clean the carburetors. I found it difficult to simply learn about one part of the engine in isolation. With everything connected, I learned about what was going into the carburetors, what was happening there, and what was coming of the carburetors.

When I was searching for information and helpful sources online, I was somewhat amazed at how much information was available for snowmobiles and carburetors that were similar to mine, but how difficult it was for me to find exactly what I wanted. There was lot of information out there that at first glance seemed as though it would be very helpful, but didn’t turn out to be. When looking for specific information in forums and YouTube, often you can find what you’re looking for immediately, but everyone should be prepared to spend an awful lot of time looking.

Moving forward, I’ve found a few seemingly reliable resources that should cut down on searching time in the future. Judging from most people that live around me, a lot of time goes into snowmobile maintenance and repairs, so I should have lots of opportunities to learn.

As far has applying learning networks to my teaching; I’ve begun to introduce my students to some websites that I know are reliable to look for help when I’m not available. I encourage my students to use videos and practice problems from KhanAcademy.org, videos from TeacherTube.com, and to look for inspiration and interesting topics on TED.com. Hopefully introducing students to websites such as these will aid them in learning more independently.

Below is the video about what I’ve learned during my Networked Learning Project (the video can also be found here, if the embedded video does not play.)

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